Business > Economic Development

Economic Development

Introduction

The economy of Plymouth is a rich, diverse mixture of traditional discrete-parts manufacturing, professional, commercial, retail and contract services, as well as, a small agricultural component. The town has a proud history of invention and innovation dating back nearly 200 years to Eli Terry's clockworks and the Eagle Lock Company.

From the early days of the Industrial Revolution powered by waterwheels and steam engines to the post-modern, technology-driven economy of the Information Age, the town draws its economic strength from the technical skills, dedication and work ethic of its people. Plymouth has embarked on several programs designed to encourage private investment, expand its industrial base, and provide a superior educational system to prepare its citizens for the technological challenges of the 21st century.

In recognition of local history, the Town sponsored preparation of the nomination for the Plymouth Center Historic District to the National Register of Historic Places.   Following a recommendation by the Connecticut Historic Preservation Board, formal designation by the U.S. Department of Interior occurred on July 22, 1999.  The Plymouth Center district, as formally amended on December 7, 2000, contains 126 contributing sites and structures, including homesteads of the Town's early industrial entrepreneurs who were instrumental in the emergence of the clock and lock industries in the colonial United States.

Additionally, the town sponsored the nomination of the Terryville Waterwheel (pictured on the front page) for inclusion in the National Register.  This wheel is one of the last remaining vestiges of Plymouth's industrial past.  It powered the Lewis Lock Company, forerunner of the Eagle Lock Company. It was formally listed on the Register effective January 4, 2002.  

 

Strategic Goals & Objectives

In April 1996, a Task Force was appointed by the Town Council to draft plans, identify opportunities for growth, initiate and support programs which will accomplish a set of economic development goals summarized as follows:

  • Diversify the industrial base by attracting technology-based growth industries, while capitalizing on existing metalworking and precision parts manufacturing capabilities.
  • Promote vocational and technical job training programs, adult education and technology driven employment opportunities.
  • Provide financial incentives for qualified businesses to expand, relocate or increase local hiring within guidelines established by state and town regulations.
  • Expand the commercial and retail base, revitalize our downtown (Main St.) areas and attract new businesses to better serve the needs of the community.
  • Improve our citizen's quality of life by enhancing recreational programs, cultural and leisure-time activities, protect its natural resources and preserve the town's historical character, rural charm and small-town heritage.

In 1998, the Plymouth Town Council adopted a business and tax incentive ordinance formally establishing a policy for providing those incentives necessary to compete in today's economic climate.

 

Business Park Expansion

Plymouth has been dedicated to promoting economic growth in the manufacturing sector since the inception of the Plymouth Business Park in 1973. All available parcels in the first two phases of the Business Park are occupied.  The Phase III expansion has added 23 new development sites to the Park, ranging in area from 1.5 to 5 acres each, capable of being combined and suitable for various sized facilities from approx. 5,000 to 50,000 sq. ft. of floor space. (See map of Phase III Expansion, Plymouth Business Park). The Business Park is zoned for general manufacturing with office uses allowed by special permit. All utilities are at the curb and improved access is available to Rte. 72 along Preston Road.

The Connecticut Department of Economic and Community Development approved the project plan in June 1999 and through the State Bond Commission granted the Town of Plymouth $1,825,000 toward its completion.  The Economic Development Administration (EDA) of the U.S. Department of Commerce is also contributing a grant of $1.1 million for the Phase III development.  The Maguire Group is the Commission's design/engineering consultant.  Richards Corporation of Terryville was the contractor responsible for the installation of all project infrastructure. 

Additional information on the Plymouth Business Park Phase III is available through CERC SiteFinder™(www.CTSiteFinder.com), through the QuickTracts program (www.quicktracts.com) or through the business park website (www.plymouthctbiz.com).

 

Commercial & Retail Activity

An active local Chamber of Commerce, in concert with the Greater Bristol Chamber works to improve retail trade and provide its members with viable programs for business development. The town is home to branch offices of 3 major banks, providing local financing and lending activities. Numerous family-owned small businesses provide a variety of goods and services to the community with old-fashioned home-town pride. There are an assortment of retail shops and stores offering everything from antiques, craft works, home appliances, automotive supplies, entertainment and convenience items. The services segment of Plymouth's retail economy offers a full complement of professional, financial, healthcare and construction enterprises. Terryville is also home to a large retail automobile dealership, two national pharmacy chains and a national supermarket chain.

Central Connecticut Corridor

The towns of Plymouth and Plainville have joined with the cities of Bristol and New Britain to form the Central Connecticut Corridor. Under the Corridor designation, a Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy (CEDS) was approved establishing continuing eligibility to receive funds from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Economic Development Administration. Under the EDA guidelines, the CEDS document analyzed the strengths and weaknesses of the four town region and developed goals, objectives and strategies for meeting the economic challenges. The work program will be reviewed and updated annually in order to measure progress in implementing the broad range of recommendations. Lead administrative responsibility is through the Central Connecticut Regional Planning Agency Staff in Bristol. The Town of Plymouth is represented by both professional staff and citizens.

 

Chamber of Commerce

The Central Connecticut Chamber of Commerce, Inc.

Contact:  Jim Albert, President/C.E.O.
200 Main Street
Bristol, CT  06010
860-584-4718
Fax: 860-589-4722
Web/URL: http://www.bristol-chamber.org/

Through a working relationship with the Town of Plymouth, The Central Connecticut Chambers of Commerce provides a range of marketing and lead generation services.  The advent of the business park expansion and renewed emphasis on the Terryville retail sector fit well into the Chamber's ongoing business outreach efforts for the region.  Using the State's "Team Connecticut" and industry cluster approach, the Chamber is well positioned to guide suitable and qualified business interests to the Plymouth Business Park.  The chamber is also a conduit for contacts with the Central Connecticut Economic Development Loan Fund and job training programs through the Capital Workforce Partners.


The Plymouth Chamber of Commerce

Contact:  Susan Murawski, President
P.O. Box 335
Terryville, CT  06786
EMail: plymouthctchamber@yahoo.com
Web Site: http://plymouthctchamber.org 
 

An affiliate of the Central Connecticut Chambers of Commerce, the Plymouth Chamber has focused its energies in improving the Plymouth and Terryville retail districts and the business park.  The local Chamber coordinates with the Economic Development Commission in identifying the strengths and weaknesses of the Town's business sector.  The Chamber provides a forum for business issues and meets regularly with town staff to enhance the economic climate of Plymouth.


Key Contacts

Town of Plymouth

  • Mayor's Office 860-585-4001
  • Land Use 860-585-4043
  • Economic Development Commission 860-585-4043

For current information, contact Margus Laan, Town Planner, 860-585-4044, mlaan@plymouthct.us

Regional Agencies

  • Central CT Economic Development Alliance 860-589-7820
  • Connected To Connecticut LLC 860-306-8325